We gladly recommend the following walking route on the above map. We have walked this route on several occasions and every time we have been surprised by the new things that we have discovered. This tour is approx. 3.5 km long, and we’d strongly recommend it. However, if you have the time, do not miss out on the alternative routes, which are indicated by the dashed lines.

The starting point of our walk is the office of the Wekerle Community Association – Wekerlei Társaskör Egyesület (10 Károly Kós Square). First, we recommend experiencing the little zigzag streets of Wekerle Estate, and finally discovering the Károly Kós Square at the end of your walk. Following the route marked on the map, walk straight ahead on Thököly Street. On your right, you will immediately notice the former post office, which closed in 2007. The post office was a part of the well-developed public institution network, and was opened in 1913.  It offered its high-quality services to the residents of the estate. The post office operated on the ground floor, while the first floor of the building housed the postmaster’s apartment. Over time, the former ornate Post Office doorway was removed, the entrance was moved to the porch, and new apartments were built on the ground floor.

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Eperfa Square can be reached by walking straight ahead. The square got its name after its renovation in 2010. It is named after the  few mulberry trees that have been growing there for a long time. The square’s  as a result renovation was a collaboration between the Association, local authority, the residents of the area and the kindergarten nearby. In one of its quarters, you will find the green map of Wekerle Estate, as well as a resting area for cyclists, while in its other quarter you may see a spice garden and seats made by middle schoolers and kindergarteners from recycled PET bottles. Located on the other side of Zalaegerszeg Street is the direction indicator post, developed by the architects of the Wekerle Community Association, showing the most important foreign and Hungarian garden cities.

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Walking between the one-storey buildings on the Corvin Boulevard you can reach Ottmár Győri Square, which received its name only a few years ago. Who was Ottmár Győri? You can find out in the chapter on the creation of the Wekerle Estate.
The industrial school was planned to be built here, but this was abandoned as a result of World War I. Today, the centennial tree (red maple) planted by volunteers commemorates the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the estate. The basalt cobblestone streets surrounding the area are specific to the street network of the estate, and commemorate Ottmár Győri. The tulip motifs on the street furniture are also a symbol of the Wekerle Estate.

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The walking route now leads from Ottmár Győri Square towards Petur Street. At the first corner on the left is one of the four buildings of the former bakery, which originally housed a bake house, a shop and an apartment. Some of the building’s characteristics are the beams with carvings of ram heads, and windows on the gables with eastern lines specific to Art Nouveau.

The bakery operated until the end of the 1960s, as a unit of the Metropolitan Baking Company which followed the nationalisation in 1949. The emergence of bread factories at the beginning of the 1970s made the small bakeries operation redundant. In 1979-80, on the occasion of the International Year of the Children, the building was modified and became the László Tőke Pioneer House, and later, after the end of the movement, the Wekerle Children’s House. Today, the building is home to the Wekerle Community Centre and Library, which is one of the most popular meeting venues of the Wekerle community.

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Hársfavirág Square. This square, which was created in a symmetrical pattern and surrounded by typical buildings, was renovated in 2010, which is also when it received its name. The ornate house was planned by Géza Fiala, whose name is also linked to the Ágyúgyár Workers’ Estate in Győr. In the centre of the square, you can rest on the tulip ornate benches while comparing the current view with the old pictures depicting the period of construction. The alley in Tamás Esze Street is beautiful all year round, and is a must-see!

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Continuing on Tamás Esze Street, you will reach the new school building. In the area, considered to be the second centre of the estate, is a kindergarten, the former school number 2 (now Erkel school), a headmaster’s building, and the new sports hall, which was completed in 2014. In the kindergarten, there are two spacious teaching rooms and, next to the playroom, a two-room apartment for teachers. The folkloristic ornaments and the facade elements,  the decorated frames of the windows, the designs of the separating elements, the studded brick footing, the carved pillars and the ornately carved balustrade, give the building a fairy tale-like atmosphere.

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The remains of a medieval church built on a hill and a cemetery surrounding the church, were discovered here during the escavation works carried out in the area. Deeper excavations also led to the finding of a Roman tomb stone.

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The police station is the estate’s eastern gate, which was built in 1912 and was based on the plans of Lajos Schodits and Béla Éberling. (The building may be observed better from the other side of the Endre Ady Street.) Its characteristic decorative elements are the arched loggias, the carved balustrades decorated with flower motifs, and the ornate back gate. The building is similar to another building designed by these architects, the building on György Dózsa Street, the former building of the Népszálló.

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On the left, you can see the former mounted police building. The plot was originally planned to house tram garages, however, the plans to create the tram lines were abandoned. The mounted police building, with a stable in its courtyard, was completed in 1912 – which is the same year that the police station was completed.

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A doctor’s office, and apartment is located on the corner of Drágfy Lane and Zoltán Street. Walking left on Zoltán Street you will arrive at the only bakery that is still operating today.
The debates concerning the establishment of the public institutions and public services can be observed by descriptions and articles that date back to that period. On October 7 1911, the issue of schools on the workers` estates, and the public services in this area were on the agenda of the cabinet meeting of the government. (At this time Sándor Wekerle was the prime minister, while László Lukács was the finance minister.)

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István Bárczy Square. In 2009, the square was named in honour of the mayor famous for his urban development program. According to the original plans, public baths should have been built here. Similarly to Eperfa and Ottmár Győri squares, István Bárczy Square was renovated following a proposal of the Community Association and was done with the help of the residents. The monument in the park lists the names of the architects known to have taken part in the planning of Wekerle Estate. A bicycle track and a “chit-chatting corner” can also be found here.

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Gutenberg boulevard. Walking under the protected plane-trees, along the main roads, only single-storey houses with 6, 8 and 12 apartments are visible. In the estate’s urban development strategy, consideration was given to not only the overall effect of the building’s structure, but also the role of trees and their different foliage in order to develop a certain urban image. You will notice that the building facades are almost only in the “shade” of the trees.
A retirement home is located at the point where these six streets intersect; a renewed and expanded house which originally contained six apartments. The Community Association operated here between the two World Wars.

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At the end of the road, you will see the Károly Kós Square (renovated in 2010), with its two monumental gates on its sides and a park in its middle.

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